Nintendo 3DS XL – Red/Black

Nintendo 3DS XL – Red/Black

  • The Nintendo 3DS XL system combines next-generation portable gaming with eye-popping 3D visuals – without the need for special glasses. Take 3D photos, connect to friends, other players, or wireless hotspots with the wireless StreetPass and SpotPass communication modes. From games to photos and beyond, Nintendo 3DS XL is the ultimate 3D entertainment system. It comes bundled with a 4GB SD card, making it perfect for downloading content from the Nintendo eShop. The Nintendo 3DS XL system plays all Nintendo DS games. Nintendo DS games will not appear in 3D.

Nintendo 3DSXL 3030078.00 Game System – 4.88″ LCD Display, 3D Ready, 3D Recording, Internet Browser, Red

List Price: $ 199.99

Price:

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3 Responses to Nintendo 3DS XL – Red/Black

  1. Jawwaad says:
    78 of 91 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    My first impressions of the 3DS XL, August 19, 2012
    By 
    Jawwaad (Baltimore) –
    = Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
    This review is from: Nintendo 3DS XL – Red/Black (Video Game)

    Well, I just came back from Target about 30 minutes ago and I picked up my 3DS XL. I picked up the red and black one. As soon as I took it out of the box I could see that this was well worth the money. IMO, the overall design is much better than the original 3DS. When you open the lid, you a hear a click that assures you that the hinge is tightly fastened. The screens are beautiful and the size of them are great. The original 3DS’s screen is dwarfed compared to the 3DS XL’s as it’s 90% bigger. The stylus is now on the side rather than on the top which I think is a better place for it, as it’s easier to get to in the middle of a game. The outer shape seems to have a more rounded design than the original 3DS. There is no docking station for recharging this time but rather it went back to the original cord in the back. Also, if you have an old DS XL case, then the 3DS XL will fit in it. I have one that I bought from BB last week for $1.99. Also, the 3DS XL comes with a 4GB card rather than the 2GB that comes with the original 3DS.

    I popped in Mario 3D just to see how the picture was and I was amazed on how vivid the colors are and how the game fits perfectly as on the DS XL, people complained that the games seemed a little blurry because of the size enhancement. I’ve registered it on clubnintendo.com and now I’m in the process of tranferring my data from original 3DS to my XL. It’s taking awhile but it was a snap making the transfer. Here’s the video I used for it.

    How to Transfer Files From a 3DS to a 3DS XL on youtube

    Update: My system has now been fully transferred and everything from my original 3DS is now on my 3DS XL including the Ambassador Program info. Took about 20 minutes give or take. Also, you have to first do a system update on your 3DS XL before you start the transfer so you’ll have to connect your 3DS XL to your WiFi connection before anything. The 3DS XL comes charged about 50% straight out of the box, so you can make the full transfer without having to charge it first. Also, for everyone who doesn’t actually own a 3DS but plans on getting one, spend the extra $30-$40 and get the XL. You definitely won’t be disappointed.

    Update #2: Well, I’ve played a few games so far such as MK 7, Mario 3D, SSF IV, and Heroes of Ruin, and I must say, it’s great. With my original 3DS, I really didn’t use the 3D aspect of it on games because I tend to move around a lot while playing and the “sweet” spot was very small to really maintain the 3D effect but it’s much bigger on the XL. Super Street Fighter IV is beautiful in 3D on such a nice sized screen. The bigger screen also added a lot of depth in MK 7 as it looks like you are really driving down a road. This bigger screen really makes me appreciate the 3D aspect of the 3DS and it’s games. The 3D XL really makes me glad to be a Nintendo fan and I can’t wait to see what they have their sleeves in the next coming months and years as far as games. I think the 3DS’s library might be able to top the DS’s in a couple of years and we all know that won’t be an easy job but I think now we have a near perfect handheld gaming device.

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  2. Relytia says:
    56 of 68 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Finally, Nintendo delivers on the 3DS’ potential (an in-depth look at the improvements and differences over the original 3DS), August 21, 2012
    By 
    Relytia (Portland, OR) –
    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)
      

    = Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
    This review is from: Nintendo 3DS XL – Red/Black (Video Game)

    If one looks at the 3DS with an unbiased, objective point of view, there is a lot to love. It was basically a next-gen successor of Nintendo’s vastly successful DS console, with the horse-power of a console somewhere between the Gamecube and the Wii. It utilized a very cool 3-D effect that, when done right, really adds to the overall immersion of the gaming experiences available on it. Everything was an improvement on the original DS. Granted, it also had some caveats and issues as well. The 3DS XL does a very good job delivering the goodness of the original 3DS, while making vast improvements over its smaller brother original. In this review, I will focus on the differences and improvements this model makes on the 3DS line. I’ll warn you right now, this is a long review. If you don’t like long reviews, then you may want to skip this. :P

    Screen Size: With a title that includes “XL,” obviously the increase in size is the biggest difference between this and the original 3DS. It may be easy to hear that the screens are 90% bigger than the original, but it really is a stark difference when you take the system out of the package and see it for yourself. The XL’s screens are HUGE compared to the original. It’s comparable to the jump between the DSi and the DSXL, for those savvy to what that means, but in this case its even bigger because the top screen is in a widescreen format. Despite the size increase, the picture is still crisp and pops with nice detail. I thought that because the screen would be bigger, but with the same resolution as the original, the XL’s picture would be distorted and fuzzy, but that’s not the case here. I’ve put the screen detail and quality through rigorous testing since buying the system, playing many different games, and the bigger picture really makes the scenery more detailed than I ever noticed before. It’s no exaggeration to say that the games actually feel new due to this greater detail. It’s great!

    Screen quality: Instead of the top half of the XL having a shiny, glossy finish of the screen and the area around it that the original featured, the 3DSXL features an almost “smoothed over” finish that was meant to lessen glare from the sun or other lights from bothering your eyes. It actually makes quite a difference. The trade-off is that the back-lighting seems just a smidgen less bright, but not much at all. One of the biggest problems I had with the original 3DS was the problem of “ghosting.” It was especially frequent in games with areas of high contrast. This was a common issue people had with the original 3DS, but I haven’t noticed it much at all yet with the XL. This is a big plus for me, because that ghosting was one of my biggest gripes with the original. I made my peace with it though, because ghosting naturally occurs from time to time with the tech being utilized in the 3DS, but to have it mostly gone here is a real treat. The colors in the XL seem brighter and a bit more vibrant as well. The touch screen is really nicely made, and seems to be a slight improvement on the original, but the difference is negligible. The saying, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,” comes to mind.

    DS backwards compatibility: Honestly, this is one of the best things about the 3DXL. If you look up comparison videos of the first 3DS playing original DS games and a DSi playing DS games, the 3DS is surprisingly inferior. The colors are more bland, the resolution is fairly fuzzy, and if you choose to play it in its native resolution to fix that blurry smudginess, the screen becomes so small it’s hardly worth doing that. The XL makes drastic improvements in all of these areas. The colors are just as bright and beautiful as playing on a normal DSiXL. Due to the larger screen size, playing in a native resolution still leaves ample room for playtime and is no longer the cramp experience the first 3DS offered. If you choose that route, the screen will be close to a normal DSi. Even if you don’t, the picture is still decent at full-size, shockingly. This fantastic backwards compatibility is a real plus in the 3DSXL’s favor and should not be understated. Massive improvement here.

    Build quality: Much like the new DSi and DSiXL made notable improvements in build quality to their predecessors, so does the XL refine the design of its predecessor. Instead of an outer glossy finish, there is a sleek matte exterior that makes the XL feel more heavy duty and refined. It definitely has a better build quality than the original. My original 3DS’ top screen hinge became fairly loose and the lock-in positions a little weak after just one instance where I accidentally jostled it. The hinges on the XL click and lock into one or two set angular positions before locking into the flat position and I know there’s no way this thing is going to break easily at all. That’s a really nice improvement. The system is surprisingly slick in its form too. It’s about the same thickness as…

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  3. Pyanfar Chanur says:
    27 of 35 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Big 3D Screen = Big 3D Difference!, September 5, 2012
    By 
    Pyanfar Chanur (USA) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      
    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)
      

    = Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
    This review is from: Nintendo 3DS XL – Red/Black (Video Game)

    When it comes to “more”, the 3DS XL is the perfect solution: each screen is nearly double the size of the original 3DS and the feel of peering into it is a bit more relaxing to my eyes than the time I spent with the smaller-screen original.

    If you’re new to the idea of the 3DS, it is Nintendo’s excellent follow-up to their handheld DS, DS Lite, and DSi consoles, with one huge difference: the top screen produces 3D visual effects without the need for any special glasses. This feature works very well, but there are some very important considerations when using either size of unit:

    - You shouldn’t play more than an hour at a time without taking a break: this technology really can strain your eyes
    - While the American Optometrists’ Association has cleared the 3DS sceen for everyday continuous use, Nintendo of America strongly urges that children limit the time they spend using the unit to short sessions, and that children under 7 not use the 3D aspect at all.
    - The effect works well when your eyes and the screen are properly balanced, but you have to train yourself to minimize how much you move your head or the unit while playing to keep your eyes properly focused.

    This last part is really the only drawback to the 3DS technology, and the reason I tend to waver between full-on 3D and fully off: when it works, it’s worth getting the full experience, but if it doesn’t, pulling the slider back doesn’t change the fact that your eyes have dropped out of the 3D ‘sweet spot’. When you play a game with 3D aspects to it, tilting the screen screws up the effect. This doesn’t sound like a big deal until you try to play a game like Starfox 3D 64, which is best flown by tilting the unit to steer the spaceship; or Kid Icarus, which flies you around on the screen but expects you to hold the unit, bang the shoulder buttons, and still manage to hold the stylus and work it across the touchscreen constantly throughout gameplay. When 3D is completely off, you can better see, but of course you don’t get to see any depth to the game. When it’s completely on, I find myself having to hold very still in order to keep my focus. More passive gameplay titles like Mario work better because it’s easier to keep the unit fairly fixed while you play and the environment is more ‘layers of side-scrolling’ than it is ‘immersion in a 3D box’.

    While 3D is the showcase of the unit, there are a LOT more added features that aren’t immediately obvious. For example, if you choose to close the lid of the unit and have it standby rather than power it down, Nintendo have given the 3DS and 3DS XL a technology called “StreetPass” that will cause you to swap data with other people who happen to walk by with a 3DS in standby mode. You can also earn gold coins by walking–the unit acts as a pedometer and with every 100 steps will award you a gold coin, which can be redeemed in some games for various goodies. Wi-fi is integrated into the 3DS so you can play with friends over the Internet, or you can play locally with friends nearby using this technology. The 3DS offers Netflix (available as a separate download) for watching movies. The Nintendo Store is integrated into the unit so that you can download games or other content (such as videos) onto the unit. The 3DS has a slot for an SDHC memory card (4GB, included) and you can load one or more cards with games or content. Last, the 3DS boasts a camera that can take 3D pictures: its twin lenses snap images that pop right out of your 3D screen.

    If you have an older DSi or 3DS, there’s good news: you can transfer your old files–pictures, videos, and game saves–to your new unit fairly simply. Like the 3DS, it contains a 3D Camera that can shoot 3D pictures and video, which has been tremendous fun to play with. There are several more apps on the unit, such as:

    - 3D Sound: record and play pack sounds
    - Mii Maker: like the Wii, you can make one or more Miis (avatars of your player)
    - StreetPass Mii Plaza: congregate with other Nintendo gamers, collecting Miis, trading items, and even co-oping your Miis with other players in little battles
    - AR Games: for those of you new to the idea, there is an amazing 3D technology that involves laying out special “AR Cards” on a flat surface and interacting with them through the camera and controls. This is probably the greatest showcase of the 3D technology I’ve seen so far. I took the main card, placed it on the table, and so long as the camera could see the card, it created all sorts of 3D games to play. The unit visually warped the tablecloth into a mini-golf course, made it look like a fish pond that I could fish from, and as I walked around the table plinking arrows into pop-up targets, I even got to fight a dragon that I could move behind or to the side of…all appearing to be happening on the tabletop in front of me. It blew me away.
    - Nintendo Zone: allows you to pull down…

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