Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2x8GB) DDR3 1600 MHz (PC3 12800) Laptop Memory (CMSX16GX3M2A1600C10) Reviews

Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2x8GB) DDR3 1600 MHz (PC3 12800) Laptop Memory (CMSX16GX3M2A1600C10)

  • 16 GB (2×8 GB) DDR3 SODIMM kit for 2G Intel Core i5 and i7 notebooks
  • 1600MHz
  • 10-10-10-27 latency
  • 1.5 volts
  • Auto-overclocking (no bios configuration required)
  • Pin Out: 204 Pin

CORSAIR high performance Vengeance SODIMM memory kit 16 GB (2×8 GB) 1600MHz 10-10-10-27, 1.5V, allows you to automatically boost performance of your 2G Intel Core i5 and i7 notebooks without bios reconfiguration. Each module is built using carefully selected DRAM to allow excellent stability and backed by Corsair’s limited lifetime warranty

List Price: $ 169.99

Price:

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3 Responses to Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2x8GB) DDR3 1600 MHz (PC3 12800) Laptop Memory (CMSX16GX3M2A1600C10) Reviews

  1. Steven Tannehill says:
    101 of 105 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Works great with late 2012 Mac mini, November 3, 2012
    By 
    Steven Tannehill (Texas, USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(http://www.amazon.com/gp/community-help/amazon-verified-purchase/183-6611351-9257446', ‘AmazonHelp’, ‘width=400,height=500,resizable=1,scrollbars=1,toolbar=0,status=1′);return false; “>What’s this?)
    This review is from: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2x8GB) DDR3 1600 MHz (PC3 12800) Laptop Memory (CMSX16GX3M2A1600C10) (Personal Computers)

    After confirming the specs on Apple’s support website, I ordered this RAM for my late 2012 Mac mini. Installation was a breeze–flip the mini over, and turn the bottom panel counterclockwise an inch, remove the panel to expose the RAM slots. Pop out the old RAM then snap in the new RAM. Replace the bottom cover and twist it clockwise back into place. It couldn’t have been easier.

    Considering that Apple wants $300 for 16 gigs of RAM (as opposed to nothing extra for 4 gigs), this is a great bargain.

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  2. Maynard Handley says:
    45 of 47 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A possibly useful explanation for 27″ iMac buyers, January 28, 2013
    By 
    Maynard Handley (Pasadena, CA United States) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(http://www.amazon.com/gp/community-help/amazon-verified-purchase/183-6611351-9257446', ‘AmazonHelp’, ‘width=400,height=500,resizable=1,scrollbars=1,toolbar=0,status=1′);return false; “>What’s this?)
    This review is from: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2x8GB) DDR3 1600 MHz (PC3 12800) Laptop Memory (CMSX16GX3M2A1600C10) (Personal Computers)

    Some buyers have expressed concern after buying this RAM and installing it in their iMacs (27″ Ivy Bridge model, late 2012).
    That iMac is specced for DDR3 1600 RAM, and ships with RAM like that, but after you install this Corsair RAM your iMac will show that it is running aRAM at 1333 MHz, not 1600. So:

    (a) The reason this is happening is that DRAM is (to simplify things tremendously) described by two parameters. One is bandwidth (essentially how much data it can transfer per second), the other is latency (how long does it take to set things up before that data starts being transferred).

    (b) Your APPLE RAM in the iMac has a bandwidth of 1600MHz and a latency (CAS) of 11 cycles.
    The Corsair RAM has a bandwidth of 1600MHz and a latency (CAS) of 10 cycles.

    (c) Given that the two sets of RAM do not have identical specs, how should the memory controller configure things for optimal performance? The timings have to be identical for both sets of RAM, meaning they have to run with identical bandwidth and identical CAS.

    (d) The CORRECT solution in this case would be to run both at 1600MHz and CAS of 11. However the solution chosen by the memory controller (I am guessing this is handled automatically by Ivy Bridge, not by Apple firmware, but I honestly have no idea) is to retain a CAS of 10, and drop the bandwidth to 1333, which is slow enough that the Apple RAM can run at a CAS of 10 rather than 11.
    This is not a completely crazy solution. For most purposes, latency is more relevant to performance than bandwidth, so if you are faced with having to choose one over the other, you should choose to drop bandwidth while preserving latency. It’s just unfortunate than in this case the algorithm (which, remember, has to work for the possibility of people plugging in four RAM DIMMs, possibly all from different manufacturers, with different bandwidths and latencies) chooses a solution that is slightly sub-optimal compared to the best possible solution.

    (e) Does it actually matter? Short answer: no. Neither Apple nor Corsair have lied to you about their RAM, and as a practical matter the difference in performance between CAS 10 and CAS 11 ram, or between running at 1600 vs 1333 is negligible (like 1%). Yes, you can undoubtedly craft some benchmark which is sensitive to the issue and which magnifies the problem, but for any real app it just doesn’t matter.
    If you are so obsessive that you cannot stand this, if you buy a second batch of Corsair 16GB RAM and replace the Apple RAM, you will get back to 1600MHz, now at CAS 10 rather than CAS 11. But you honestly won’t notice any performance difference.

    Bottom lines:
    - The extra RAM is nice — it means paging on my iMac moves from being a rare occurrence to a non-existent occurrence, and allows that much more file system data to be stored in RAM;
    - iMac will show the speed of your combined system (if you bought only two sticks, not four) as 1333 MHz, not 1600;
    - There is no reason to be upset or worried about this. It does not mean anyone cheated you or that your system is running slower than it otherwise would.

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  3. Trevor says:
    38 of 39 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Excellent, July 20, 2012
    By 
    Trevor (New Jersey) –
    Amazon Verified Purchase(http://www.amazon.com/gp/community-help/amazon-verified-purchase/183-6611351-9257446', ‘AmazonHelp’, ‘width=400,height=500,resizable=1,scrollbars=1,toolbar=0,status=1′);return false; “>What’s this?)
    This review is from: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2x8GB) DDR3 1600 MHz (PC3 12800) Laptop Memory (CMSX16GX3M2A1600C10) (Personal Computers)

    Corsair has always been one of my go-to’s for memory, and so far they’ve never let me down, this product included. I just purchased a Lenovo ThinkPad T430. The machine defaults with 4GB of RAM, and in order to upgrade to 16GB from Lenovo was over $800, which is obviously a huge profit center for them. So I ordered it with the default 4GB of RAM, and then ordered this Corsair kit for $120. It’s a great deal. This is full speed 1600mhz DDR3. Mine was a perfectly matched set, the serial numbers were 1 apart so you know they were made at the same time and share the same nuances that will allow them to work well in Dual Channel. I’ve run multiple memory tests and stress tests on the machine overall and had absolutely zero problems. Having 16GB on my new laptop is really quite astounding, paired with a Core i7 and I’m able to run virtual machines effortlessly with no concern for memory.

    One little caveat for ThinkPad users, and this has absolutely nothing to do with the memory but I thought worth mentioning: If you’re replacing both modules on a ThinkPad, one of them is under the keyboard, while the other is exposed through a hatch on the underside. It’s not difficult to replace but should be done with care, be sure to follow the Lenovo service manual so you know which parts to remove in what order to gain access to the DIMM slot.

    Also worth noting is I was able to take the original 4GB DIMM that came with my laptop and place it in another to upgrade that system to 8GB, which would not have been possible if I bought the more expensive upgrade from Lenovo originally.

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